U.S. HISTORY

This class is designed to introduce the student to the history of the United States from 1890 to the present.  The course of study will cover major political, economic, and social experiences from both a domestic and international perspective.

HONORS U.S. HISTORY

The purpose of this two-semester class will be a chronological study of the key events of people and major historical trends of U.S. History fro 1890 to the present.  This class is designed to introduce the student to the history of the United States from 1890 to the present.  Emphasis will be placed on the 20th Century, including the following topics: immigration, industrialization, Imperialism, the development of American Foreign Policy, the Changing U.S. Economy, and important political and domestic developments of this century.

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS

This course covers world civilizations from the end of the medieval period to modern times with a review of ancient and medieval times.  This course traces ten themes through history: geography, economic organization, politics and law, war and diplomacy, technology, religion, philosophy, science and arts, social relations, and cross-cultural interaction.  The following regions will be explored: ancient civilizations in Egypt, China, India, the Mediterranean, ancient Greece and Rome, Feudalism in Europe, Japan, Renaissance and Reformation in Europe, Industrial Revolution, building of nation-states, nationalism, imperialism and revolutions.

HONORS WORLD CIVILIZATIONS

This course will stress historical inquiry and writing skills.  Honors World Civilizations covers world civilizations from the end of the medieval period to modern times with a review of ancient and medieval times.  This course traces ten themes through history:  geography, economic organization, politics and law, war and diplomacy, technology, religion, philosophy, science and arts, social relations, and cross-cultural interaction.  The following regions will be explored: ancient civilizations in Egypt, China, India, the Mediterranean, ancient Greece and Rome, Feudalism in Europe, Japan, Renaissance and Reformation in Europe, Industrial Revolution, building of nation-states, nationalism, imperialism and revolutions.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

The purpose of the class will be to examine the various institutions, which make up the American governmental system.  The Constitution and its overriding impact on the American governmental system will be of prime importance.  Much attention will also be given to the powers of the President and how they are used to influence governmental policy, the powers of Congress and how they are exerted in the lawmaking process, and the powers of the judges, especially in the Supreme Court, in interpreting and applying law. Other topics covered will be:  The Bill of Rights and the early formative years of our government, our system of laws (including criminal, civil, and constitutional law) , political parties and beliefs, elections and voter behavior, citizenship, and current events.

HONORS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

The purpose of this class is to involve the student in the American political process.  Not only will students learn the institutions in the American system, but to appreciate their role in that system.  As a result, student participation will be a major element in class activities.  In addition to the basic governmental institutions, students will examine the role of public opinion, lobbyists, and the part each citizen can play in influencing his or her government.  It is also important that students understand that they will need to spend some time outside of class visiting courts, participating in political campaigns and simulations, and visiting local government at work.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (ONLINE)

The purpose of the class will be to examine the various institutions, which make up the American governmental system. The Constitution and its overriding impact on the American governmental system will be of prime importance. Much attention will also be given to the powers of the President and how they are used to influence governmental policy, the powers of Congress and how they are exerted in the lawmaking process, and the powers of the judges, especially in the Supreme Court, in interpreting and applying law. Other topics covered will be: The Bill of Rights and the early formative years of our government, our system of laws (including criminal, civil, and constitutional law) political parties and beliefs, elections and voter behavior, citizenship, and current events.

The online American Government course is led by a Titan or Monarch high school teacher who guides students through the curriculum. Online course curriculum is organized around modules or units. Students have some flexibility with time to complete each unit/module, but are expected to meet targeted deadlines. Students will engage with the instructor and other students in a highly collaborative digital environment while completing each online course. Class format includes independent reading, individual assignments, public discussion boards, individual/group projects/authentic activities, and other multimedia tools to engage students in an online modality.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT/POLITICS: UNITED STATES

AP curriculum for American Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective of government and politics in the United States.  The course is divided into six major areas of study: 1) Constitutional Underpinnings, 2) Political Beliefs and Behaviors, 3) Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mass Media, 4) Institutions: Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, Courts, 5) Public Policy, 6) Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.  Students who take this course gain college-level skills and have the option of earning college credit through either the AP exam or dual enrollment, both of which require an extra fee.  Students must check with colleges for their individual policies regarding AP exams/dual enrollment credits.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT/POLITICS: COMPARATIVE

The AP Comparative Government and Politics course is designed to study the relationships between nations in a modern world.  The two major objectives of the course are to learn about the current political systems of six different nations, and to analyze those nations with regard to several overarching themes.  To accomplish the first objective, students study the current governments of six core nations: Britain, Mexico, China, Iran, Russia and Nigeria.  For the second objective, students focus on themes such as globalization, democratization, political change, public policy, and citizen-state relations.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principals, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology.  They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  Students who take this course gain college-level skills and have the option of earning college credit through the AP exam, which requires and extra fee.  Students must check with colleges for their individual policies regarding AP exams.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY

This course is an extension of HON American History, designed as a college level history course.  Students will study United States chronologically as well as topically.  Topics will include: political institutions and behavior; public policy; social and economic change; diplomacy and international relations; and cultural and intellectual developments.  This is a broad survey course covering discovery to present day.  The course moves at a fast pace and requires independent reading.  Students should expect a small summer reading assignment in order to ease pressure during the school year.  Students who take this course gain college-level skills and have the option of earning college credit through either the AP exam or dual enrollment, both of which require and extra fee.  Students must check with colleges for their individual policies regarding AP exams/dual enrollment credits.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes, contacts, and interactions of different human societies. The course begins in 8000 C.E. and continues through the present.  We begin with the development of human civilizations and use that foundational understanding as a basis for understanding the increasing encounters and interactions between societies.  Emphasis will be given to comparisons between major societies, the creation of international trade networks, causes and consequences of major movements, and analysis/interpretation of historical evidence.

PSYCHOLOGY

The purpose of this course is to focus on the scientific study of human and animal behavior with the goal of assisting students to understand, predict, and modify behavior.  Students will be able to apply the psychological principles they learn in class to their daily lives.  By applying these principles, students will gain a greater understanding of themselves as well as others.

PSYCHOLOGY (ONLINE)

The purpose of this course is to focus on the scientific study of human and animal behavior with the goal of assisting students to understand, predict, and modify behavior. Students will be able to apply the psychological principles they learn in class to their daily lives. By applying these principles, students will gain a greater understanding of themselves as well as others.
The online Psychology course will be led by a Titan or Monarch high school teacher who guides students through the curriculum. Online course curriculum is organized around modules or units. Students have some flexibility with time to complete each unit/module, but are expected to meet targeted deadlines. Students will engage with the instructor and other students in a highly collaborative environment while completing each online course. Class format includes independent reading, individual assignments, discussion boards, individual/group projects/authentic activities, and other multimedia tools to engage students in an online modality.

SOCIOLOGY

The purpose of this course is to study society and human behavior in social or group settings.  The focus of the course is that all human experiences are touched and shaped by social forces not always of the individual’s making.  This includes a comprehensive examination of the basic concepts, principles, and methods central to the scientific study of sociology.  Whereas psychology looks at the behavior of the individual, sociology studies the behavior of society in groups from the sociologist’s viewpoint of observing, describing, analyzing, and predicting human behavior in social contexts of groups, neighborhoods, cities, and whole societies.

 ISSUES AND GEOGRAPHY IN THE MODERN WORLD

This course is intended for students who are interested in the ever-changing world in which we live today.  As our world becomes more complex, it is essential that we understand the different issues that affect us today and more importantly will affect us in the years to come.  This course will complement and reinforce what students have learned in American History and Government, World Civilizations and other social studies electives.  This class is designed to introduce students to a variety of perspectives concerning Contemporary Issues and Geography in the world today.  The focus of the course will be on the major issues affecting the world today from struggle in the Middle East to tension among nations in Africa; from environmental concerns around the globe to dealing with natural disasters wherever they occur.  These issues for the course will change as issues change in the world today.  The goals of the class will be:  1) for students to develop an understanding of contemporary issues in a historical, cultural and geographic context, 2) to increase the students’ ability to process and gather information from a variety of sources, 3) to develop a student’s ability to view contemporary issues from multiple perspectives, and 4) to develop an awareness of the global nature of issues and relate to their concerns.  Due to the changing nature of this course, there will be no textbook.  Much of the content and related materials will be web based.

ISSUES AND GEOGRAPHY IN THE MODERN WORLD (ONLINE)

This course is intended for students who are interested in the ever-changing world in which we live today. As our world becomes more complex, it is essential that we understand the different issues that affect us today and more importantly will affect us in the years to come. This course will complement and reinforce what students have learned in American History and Government, World Civilizations and other social studies electives. This class is designed to introduce students to a variety of perspectives concerning Contemporary Issues and Geography in the world today. The focus of the course will be on the major issues affecting the world today from struggle in the Middle East to tension among nations in Africa; from environmental concerns around the globe to dealing with natural disasters wherever they occur. These issues for the course will change as issues change in the world today. The goals of the class will be: 1) for students to develop an understanding of contemporary issues in a historical, cultural and geographic context, 2) to increase the students’ ability to process and gather information from a variety of sources, 3) to develop a student’s ability to view contemporary issues from multiple perspectives, and 4) to develop an awareness of the global nature of issues and relate to their concerns. Due to the changing nature of this course, there will be no textbook. Much of the content and related materials will be web based.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS, MACROECONOMICS

The purpose of this course is to study how people produce, consume, exchange, and distribute goods and services.  Students will try to determine how societies decide economic issues such as what to produce, how to produce, and how to divide wealth.  Some economic theory will also be included.  Students will also try to decide how business, labor, consumers, and government relate to each other in the economy.  This course is not a math class but theoretical graphs are involved.  Students who take this course gain college-level skills and have the option of earning college credit through the AP exam, which requires an extra fee.  Students must check with colleges for their individual policies regarding AP exams.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS, MICROECONOMICS

The purpose of the AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of markets and includes the study of how markets and governments interact. This course is not a math class but theoretical graphs and basic computations are involved. Students who take this course gain college-level skills and have the option of earning college credit through the AP exam, which requires an extra fee. Students must check with colleges for their individual policies regarding AP exams.

ECONOMICS

Economics is the study of how our scarce productive resources are used to satisfy human wants.  By studying key economic concepts, this course will help students become prepared to make rational economic choices both in their own lives and in their participation in policy decisions as citizens of a city, state, nation, and the world. The study of Economics provides students with analytical tools for interpreting economic events and making personal economic choices, even under changed conditions.